Cliff Ryder

25/03/2021

Our Journey: Cliff Ryder’s Family, Part 3

Here is the last part of a series of blog posts that is based on a chapter about the Ryder family from my book Connection: Aboriginal Child Artists Captivate Europe. You can find the first part here and the second part here. ‘I must tell you about the trip that […]
24/03/2021
The boys of Carrolup marching for Mrs Rutter and Mrs Hack. Photograph taken by Vera Hack, January 1950.

Our Journey: Cliff Ryder’s Family, Part 2

My last blog was the first of a series that is based on a chapter about the Ryder family from my book Connection: Aboriginal Child Artists Captivate Europe. These are the words of Charon Ryder, oldest of the Ryder siblings: ‘I want to talk to you about how I got […]
23/03/2021

Our Journey: Cliff Ryder’s Family, Part 1

Some of you will know that John and I have developed a strong relationship with the children of the Carrolup child artist Cliff Ryder. In September 2019, we spent a lovely day with the family at the Moore River Settlement and Goomalling, finishing with an emotional gathering at […]
12/10/2020

Child Artists of the Australian Bush

Linda and I were in York this weekend with our great friends Graham and Cindy. When I am in a new town, I usually drop in to any bookshop I come across. In this case, it was Barclays Books, a shop well worth visiting if you are a […]
19/11/2019

The 9th Annual Maali Football Carnival

I often think about the young Aboriginal children of Carrolup, particularly when I am working on the book I have been writing. I think of the Carrolup children’s legacy, not just their artworks, but also their amazing story. I think of their children and grandchildren, and reflect on […]
18/09/2019

A Day Out With the Ryder Family

Last month, I wrote about receiving communications from Charon and Judy Ryder, daughters of the Carrolup child artist Cliff Ryder. I then described the meeting that John and I had with Charon and her husband John Kalin, along with their four-year old grandson Treyje. Last Saturday, John and I spent a […]
29/08/2019

Talking About Cliff Ryder’s Family

NB. If you haven’t previously read my previous blog posting about Charon Ryder, please do so before reading the present post. It provides important background. I recently blogged about my initial discussions with Charon Ryder, eldest child of Cliff Ryder, one of the outstanding Carrolup child artists. John […]
27/08/2019

Carrolup Artist and Father: Cliff Ryder

Last month, Charon Ryder emailed me saying that she was the eldest child of Carrolup artist Cliff Ryder and requesting that I get in contact with her. I had previously been contacted by Charon’s sister Judy, who had written a lovely comment which I included in a previous blog. […]
16/07/2019
Some of the Carrolup young artists. Front row: Reynold Hart (Far Left), Parnell Dempster (Middle) and Revel Cooper (Far Right). Back row, 2nd Left: Barry Loo. Do you know who the other boys are?

Child Artists of Carrolup: Reflections

Mary Durack Miller, in association with Florence Rutter, wrote a book about the Aboriginal child artists of Carrolup entitled, Child Artists of the Australian Bush, which was published in June 1952. Florence Rutter met the child artists through her two visits to Carrolup in 1949 and 1950 and exhibited their artworks […]
09/07/2019
Four unidentified Carrolup boys with their pastel drawing books. Photographer: Vera Hack, January 1950. Noel & Lily White Collection.

Identifying the Children of Carrolup

An important aim of our project has been to connect people today with ‘content’ relating to family members who were at Carrolup all those years ago. This content may take the form of photographs, the children’s drawings and letters, or documents from various sources. Last week, I posted […]
08/01/2019
Hunters by Revel Cooper, pastel on paper, 29 x 38cm, c.1948. Stan, Melvie and Gael Phillips Collection, 1947 – 65, Berndt Museum of Anthropology. [WU7304]

The Liminality of Dusk

The Carrolup child artists appear to have been particularly fascinated with the liminality of dusk. That is, the period between day and night when the light gradually fades to become night; when the breeze settles and becomes stillness personified, and when colours become simply black and white. When […]
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